Our NEW Musical Math Vol. 2 CD is HERE!!!! (FREE SHIPPING!)

 

Musical Math Vol2 Header Lg

 

Today I am super excited to announce that our brand new Musical Math Vol. 2 CD is finally HERE!  This collection of songs were written especially to support the primary Common Core Math Concepts that most of us are now responsible to teach in our Kindergarten, first grade, and second grade classes.  To celebrate our newest CD, we are having a FREE SHIPPING SALE during this weekend only!  Use the code MATH2 (all in capital letters, and with no spaces) for free shipping on any order from today until January 31st at midnight, Pacific time.

The songs are fun, modern sounding and upbeat, and I think that this CD is going to be a huge HIT!  I’ve already started using some of them in my friend Julie’s class, and so far they have been extremely useful!  I’ll tell you more about my first lesson on 12 Vs. 21 in the next blog post, so stay tuned, but here is the video that goes with it!  And if you would like to know more about Musical Math Volume ONE, click here.  :)

 

 

And yes, before you ask, one day this CD will have a DVD version to go with it- but probably not until next fall sometime.  So, we’ll just have to be patient on that.  My husband is trying to animate each song to illustrate in a clear, but fun way exactly what each math concept means.  Meanwhile, my assistant Krista and I have written up all of the movements in “stick figure format” for you, as usual!  This 86 page document is free for you to download right here. 

I also have uploaded it as a SlideShare document and embedded it into this post below, so you can scroll through it yourself and see the whole thing!  Take a look!  You can download the Slideshare version, too, on Slideshare.net.


 

 Here is a list of all of the songs, in order:

1. Greater Than, Fewer Than

2. Subitize

3. Rekenrek Song

4. Mission Ways to Make Four

5. What’s a Sum?

6. Counting On with Addition

7. Counting by Threes

8. Putting Numbers in Order

9. Odds & Evens

10. Hexagon

11. Trapezoid

12. Cylinder

13. Measuring with a Ruler

14. The Pattern of the Hundreds Chart

15. 12 vs. 21

16. Counting Backwards from 20

17. Telling Time is Easy

18. One Half

19. One Fourth

20. Counting Coins

21. Adding Numbers to Ten

22. So Many Ways to Solve a Problem

23. Keywords for Addition

24. Keywords for Subtraction

25. Get on the Ten’s Bus!

26. What is Place Value?    (This song was co-written by me and my new friend, Rockin’ Dan the Teaching Man, with support from my ever faithful music arranger and co-writer Mike Cravens.)  Mike, of course, did all of the background music for every song and helped write all of the other songs as well!

Greater Than, Fewer Than Motions

I am sure that I will be writing a lot more about how to use this resource soon, so I’ll let you go for now! Have a great weekend!

 

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Best Paid & Free Emergent Readers for Kindergarten

Best Paid & Free Emergent Readers for Kindergarten

Here is a review of the very best paid and free emergent readers and emergent reading book sets that I used in my Kindergarten classroom to teach reading for many years!  I have also included an explanation of why I used and valued each set of books.

It’s important to note that I used these book sets in combination with each other, rather than just one single set.  I also mixed in other single books that I got in various places, but usually from the Scholastic Book Club, often with Bonus Points or with a combination of points, coupons, and cash.

 

How to Pick the Right Level of Book

If you are just getting started with supplemental emergent readers in your curriculum, you may be a little confused about where to begin.  In that case, the best thing to do is simply pick one book that you think your child might enjoy and just try it!  Have a few books of different levels on hand so that you have several to try out.

 

If your child is breezing right through the first book and it seems like he is learning almost nothing from it, then bump him up a level and try again.  Keep moving up a level until you find a book that is not too easy and not too hard.  If a child is stumbling over more than one word per page on these emergent readers, than you probably have a book that is too hard.

 

If the child is frustrated and unhappy, then again, you probably have a book that is too hard.  On the other hand, if the child is enjoying it and wants to read another one, you probably hit the nail right on the head!   Watch your child to see which one the child WANTS to read (probably because he is successful), and start there.  From there, you can slowly move forward and teach your child more!

 

80+ Free printable sight word readers from the Measured Mom!

 

Let’s start with the free, printable books!  You can certainly print out free books from many sites.  The best site (and my current favorite) is The Measured Mom, which has GOBS of free printable books, and doesn’t charge for a single one!

 

FREE Sight Word Readers for Valentine's Day from the Measured Mom.

FREE Sight Word Readers for Valentine’s Day from the Measured Mom.

AMAZING!  (“The Measured Mom” is a former school teacher with a Master’s Degree in education who now stays at home with her children.  ALL of the resources on her site are top quality, and they are ALL FREE!)

Here are some more suggestions from readers for other great free printable emergent readers:

Jennifer:  My favorite free printable books are from Hubbardscupboard.org.  They have word family books, sight word books, and cvc books, and more.

Rachelle:  Have you checked out Reading the Alphabet by This Reading Mama? It is a free program online and I LOVE it! It focuses on a specific letter sound each week and is built around sight words that build on each other. She also has a plethora of free activities to go with each book.

Follow HeidiSongs’s board Emergent Readers on Pinterest.

 

You can also check my Pinterest Emergent Reader board, where I pin free printable emergent readers all the time!  In fact, it’s rare when I pin anything there that is not free!  Above is a preview of what my Emergent Reader board looks like.  By the way, if you know if a great free resource I should pin to this board, please leave a comment below and I will certainly pin it!  Sometimes I run out of time to search.

Commercially Available Books

We used the Houghton Mifflin language arts program at the school that I used to teach at, and then supplemented as necessary with other books.  I think that supplementing is incredibly important, because it helps fill in the gaps that any language arts series might have, and what I found was that the children needed MUCH more practice reading real books than the Houghton Mifflin series provided.

 

This is a picture of a book from the series I used at the school where I used to work.  The books are no longer in print.

This is a picture of a book from the series I used at the school where I used to work. The books are no longer in print, so far as I can tell.  But I enjoyed using many of the titles in this series!  I could almost always find a book that “featured” a certain sight word, but at the same time they were leveled from A-D, as I recall.

 

The picture above shows a book from the supplemental book set that we had.  I liked that the pictures were in color and usually cute.  Many of the easiest books had a repetitive pattern and featured one certain sight word to work on in each book.  At the same time, they were leveled, so the length of the sentences and vocabulary got a tiny bit harder with each new section.  Some of them had a few CVC words in them, too.  It’s a shame that those books are now totally out of print!

 

SONY DSC

However, these Reading Reading books pictured above are a very close match, and they actually look much better anyway!  (The company is located in Reading, Pennsylvania, and hence the name!)  The book sets pictured on the homepage all look great to me.  I’ve seen them “in person” at conferences, and I spent some time thumbing through them,  and I really wanted to purchase them, but we already had book sets at school to use and we had no budget for new ones.

If I had the budget for a nice set of emergent readers, the Reading Reading Books would be my choice!  Here’s why:

A big advantage of the Reading Reading Books is the great readability of the lower level books, and the fact that it includes both fiction and non-fiction.  The books are carefully leveled and planned out to be a part of a curriculum, rather than simply fun supplemental reading at home.  I also really like that it has both photographs AND great illustrations for the children.

What do Reading Reading Books Pages Look Like?

Because of this, I think that these books really are a cut above the rest, but they are much pricier than the other sets I’ve listed below.  A typical six book set of readers is $27.50.  One single book is $4.75.  The very large set pictured above has got about 1700 books and 264 titles for $5965.  (Gulp!)  There are much smaller sets, though, for much less money.  Unless these are going to be the only books that you teach reading from, you really don’t need to purchase that many.

 

Bob Books

 

This is the box with some of my Bob Books in them.  As you can see, they are getting worn out!

This is the box with some of my Bob Books in them. As you can see, they are getting worn out!

I have also used Bob Books to practice CVC Words.  In my opinion, the Bob Books are just “okay” -(the stories are not all that great,) but then the books are not very expensive, either.  I used both Set One and Set Two with my students.

Bob-Books-page-3

One of the things I don’t like about the Bob Books is that the illustrations aren’t great.  They are just drawings- no photos- and everything is in black and white, or at least it used to be.  These days, I have seen a little bit of color thrown into some of the newer editions, as in the photo above that I found online.  Also, they are all fiction.  There is no informational print at all that I have seen in my sets of books.

 

Bob Books Mat

This is the first and easiest book in the Bob Book series. They are very easy to read and are based strictly on phonics.

 

The stories are written to include words that fall within basic word families, and they are totally phonics based readers.  If you look at the titles of each book, it is easy to guess which word family the book focuses on.

 

This Bob Book is about halfway through the books in set one.  I included the picture so you can see how hard the books get.

This Bob Book is about halfway through the books in set one. I included the picture so you can see how difficult the books get.

There are a couple of Bob Books for each vowel sound that you might study, so a few for short A, a few for short I, etc.  I wanted each child in my group of six to have a book, so I bought seven sets (one for each child and an extra book for me.)

 

This book comes near the end of the series of Bob Books, Set One.  This is probably the most difficult book in the set.

This book comes near the end of the series of Bob Books, Set One. This is probably the most difficult book in the set.

There are 12 books in the box, and each box costs $9.99.  So for about $70 I got 84 books.  These work great for CVC words, but you’ll still need to find something for your students to practice reading with more sight words in them, though.  I wouldn’t use this set exclusively to teach reading.

Here is another option that was suggested by a reader that is similar to the Bob Books:

Diane:  “Our favorite fiction emergent readers are similar to the Bob books, but with cute illustrations and silly stories. They are called Playful Pals and you can check them out here.  They are written by a kindergarten teacher. The first set has lots of CVC words (focusing on one vowel per book) and a few sight words. They get progressively harder and have a strong phonics base. I absolutely LOVE these and so do my kids.”

 

Biscuit Phonics Fun (My First I Can Read Books)

 

Biscuit phonics boxed set

 

Similar to the Bob Books are the My First I Can Read Phonics Box Sets.  I had a set of Biscuit themed books.  They were called Biscuit Phonics Fun (My First I Can Read) books.

 

Biscuit Book 1

This is the very first, easiest book in the Biscuit series. Note how much harder this would be to read for a beginner than the Bob Books or even the Dick and Jane Books below.

There were 12 books in the boxed set, and I purchased seven boxed sets so that everyone in my group would have a book.

This is the sixth book in the Biscuit Books set.  I included it so that you can see how hard the books get as you go along.

This is the sixth book in the Biscuit Books set. I included it so that you can see how hard the books get as you go along.

 

One boxed set of 12 little books is now $11.51 on Amazon.  My kids liked them a lot more than the Bob Books because the illustrations and characters are a lot more appealing to most of the children.  However, these books are a little bit harder than the Bob Books because they do use more sight words in them and the vocabulary is not as restricted as in the Bob Books.  

 

Biscuit Book 10

This is the tenth book in the set of twelve. As you can see, the vocabulary does not seem to be put together in these stories in a sequential way so that the beginning books are easier than the final books.

As you can see, the vocabulary does not seem to be put together in these stories in a sequential way so that the beginning books are much significantly easier than the final books. In fact, the last book in the set was the easiest one to read of all, with nothing more than “I like ____,” sentences in the whole thing!  It was marked as a “review” book. I’m pretty sure a K/1 teacher didn’t give much input on the text on this series.

Batman Phonics

If you look at this link, you’ll see that they sell MANY themed boxed sets under the “My First I Can Read” title, and they even have them for Batman and Spiderman!  

Spiderman Readers

 

If I had a group that was just boys (or girls that I thought would enjoy them,) I would certainly check those out.  There are even people that are buying them USED on Amazon, and that would really be a big savings!

The all star line up of these Phonics Fun boxed set books included the Berenstain Bears, Fancy Nancy, Little Critter, Pinkalicious, and My Little Pony, in addition to SpiderMan and BatMan!  I would venture a guess that they are probably all about the same quality, but if anyone out there has experienced anything different, I would LOVE to hear from you!  I can easily update this post!

 

Scholastic Guided Science Readers

 

 

Guided Science Readers Set from Scholastic

This is the Guided Science Readers Set of books that I got a couple of years ago from the Scholastic Book Club.

 

Because there are so many great beginning fiction emergent readers out there that can be purchased inexpensively (or even downloaded FREE!), one alternative is to purchase the non-fiction books separately.  This set, called the  Scholastic Science Readers, are a great choice for this purpose, and they are very reasonably priced!

 

Here is a picture of all of the books in the set.  As you can see, the topics are ones that are typically covered in most early childhood classrooms.

Here is a picture of all of the books in the set of Guided Science Readers I got from the Scholastic Book Club. As you can see, the topics are ones that are typically covered in most early childhood classrooms.  There is now a “Super Set” of Guided Science Readers sold on Amazon with twice as many books included as I had.

 

I found the “Super Set” of Science Readers right here for $70.00, plus $3.99 shipping (that’s less than Amazon!) and it includes 144 books, with full color photos!

 

Bat Book pg 3

I was able to purchase this set from the Book Club with coupons and points, etc. at the beginning of my last year of teaching.  So, I only had a chance to use them for one school year.

 

This is an example of a level A reader from the Guided Science Readers Set from Scholastic.

This is an example of a level A reader from the Guided Science Readers Set from Scholastic.

I really liked the  Scholastic Science Readers ,and I especially liked that they are leveled and sequential.  They have four titles written for level A, four titles for B, four titles for C, and four titles for level D.

 

This is an example of a level B reader from the Guided Science Readers Set from Scholastic.

This is an example of a level B reader from the Guided Science Readers Set from Scholastic.

There are six books of each of 24 titles in the “Super Set” on Amazon.  I have a smaller set sold on the Book Club, but it seemed to be just fine, and my kids really liked reading about the science topics.  It looks like you can get a set with just one book of each title on Amazon for $14.70.

 

Here is a book from Level C of the Guided Science Readers Collection.

Here is a book from Level C of the Guided Science Readers Collection.

 

And here is one more picture of the Level D book from the Guided Science Collection.

 

Night Animals Science Reader

 

For kids that can read sight words, but struggle with phonics:  pull out those old Dick and Jane Books!

 

Kids that know just a very few sight words (even just six words) can begin to read the Dick and Jane stories in this book.

Kids that know just a very few sight words (even ten or fewer words) can begin to read the Dick and Jane stories in this book.  These stories are based on sight word instruction, rather than phonics instruction.

There is one other thing that I would like to mention.  I also had a set of these books, called a Storybook Treasury of Dick and Jane & Friends.  Now I know that Dick and Jane is now a “dirty word,” but the reason why I sometimes use it is because it focused exclusively on SIGHT WORDS ONLY, and ignores phonics entirely.  If I could find a newer, updated book set that would do the same thing, I would certainly switch!

 

Dick & Jane Storybook Treasury Set

Here is the Dick and Jane Book Set that I own.

Since I always introduced sight words first through my Sing and Spell the Sight Word songs, I had children that might know eight or ten sight words, but couldn’t yet sound out any CVC words yet at all because it was too early in the Kindergarten year and we hadn’t introduced them yet!  Yet the children could begin to read the Dick and Jane books knowing only those sight words.  If you are not familiar with the HeidiSongs Sing and Spell series, here is a video below from Sing and Spell Vol. 5 so you can see what I’m talking about:

 

This is the very first story in the Dick and Jane book.

This is the very first story in the Dick and Jane book.

So even though the vocabulary is severely restricted in comical ways, such as a page with nothing but, “Oh, oh, oh!”  and then another with “Oh, Dick!”  and “Oh, oh, Dick!”, the children can figure out what is going on by looking at the pictures and still enjoy the story.

 

Dick & Jane Baby Story

Here is another story that appears early in the Dick and Jane book.

The other good thing about Dick and Jane is that children that struggle with sounding out words in general often can STILL successfully read Dick and Jane books. And they are the only books I have found for which that is actually true.  So I usually begin with these books, and then quickly switch over to the other phonics books later once the children had a handle on sounding out words.  And would you believe:  Some of these Dick and Jane books are now sold used on Amazon for only 40 cents, plus shipping!  And there are LOTS of stories in each book.

 

I eventually switched to this tiny book set, which has exactly the same stories in it as the larger book, divided into smaller books for little hands.

I eventually switched to this tiny book set, which has exactly the same stories in it as the larger book, divided into smaller books for little hands.  These books are now out of print.

 

I used to send the books home with the children to read for their homework, and would include a small paper note that also served as a bookmark.  It said that the child was supposed to read pages ___ to ____, (etc.), and if the parent and child chose to read more, I could not supply something extra to read the following week.  :0  I eventually switched to these small books so that they would get just one story per week, but these little boxed book sets are now out of print.

 

Conclusions:

So!  Remember: I used a combination of all four of these books, and rotated them in and out so that the children would get the best of all of the worlds in the classroom with me.  Never once did we get a chance to read ALL of the books from one of the book sets.

1.  I started with the Reading Reading books, just letting the children get used to tracking the print with their fingers, and finding words vs. letters and finding concepts of print.

2.  Then I switched to the Dick and Jane series as soon as we learned just a few sight words.

3.  Then,  I switched to the Bob Books to work on sounding out the CVC words along with a few sight words.

4.  After that, I alternated with the Guided Science Readers for Non-Fiction print and the Reading Reading books for Sight Words print.

I hope that helps!  Let me know if you have any other questions for me!

Heidi Butkus

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Does Tracing Sight Words Help Children Learn?

Does Tracing Sight Words Help Kids Learn?

Does tracing words help kids learn to read and spell them?  Teachers have been asking children to trace letters, words, and numbers as a way to help them learn probably since… well, forever!  But is there any research to back up this practice?  This question was asked of me recently via email, and I researched the answer in order to reply.  I thought that this might be useful information to post here on my blog as well, just in case anyone ever needed to know.  Hope it helps!

 

QUESTION:

 

Patrick Wksheet Close Up

 

I was being observed by my principal this week.  We were singing one of your Sight Word Songs and then doing one of your sight word workbook pages. Later she asked me if had any research on tracing letters and words. I’m not sure what she meant by this, but do you know of any research about the pros and cons of tracing?

 

Spelling Tracing Worksheet Have from HeidiSongs

This is an example of one of our sight word worksheets that includes tracing.  We have these worksheets to accompany all six of our Sing and Spell the Sight Words DVD’s.  To find them, click on the sight word DVD that you want, and then scroll down and you’ll find the workbook that goes with each one.

 

ANSWER:

This is what I think, and what I have experienced after 25 years of teaching Kindergarten and first grade.  Young children learn best when they are actively involved.  Tracing words is one way that to reinforce their learning, but I would never use tracing alone to teach them!  I include it as a way to reinforce what I have taught through music, movement, and through meaningful opportunities to practice reading and writing those words in context.

 

THE RESEARCH:

Here is one article on tracing words. It was shown to be effective with preschoolers that have learning disabilities.  The article is called, “THE EFFECTS OF USING VISUAL PROMPTS, TRACING, AND CONSEQUENCES TO TEACH TWO PRESCHOOL STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES TO WRITE THEIR NAMES.”

 

This is another page from our Sight Word Worksheet Books.

This is another page from our Sight Word Worksheet Books.

 

This article also has a little bit of information on using tracing to help children with dyslexia learn to discriminate between letters that look alike, such as the lower case b and d.  Look all the way at the bottom of the page under the heading of Helping Children with Reversals. The article is called, “About Dyslexia and Reading Problems.”

 

Sight Word Worksheet 2 from HeidiSongs

 

I think that this article is the best one of all!  It’s called, “How Handwriting Trains the Brain.”  Best quotes from the article:

 

 

“Recent research illustrates how writing by hand engages the brain in learning. During one study at Indiana University published this year, researchers invited children to man a “spaceship,” actually an MRI machine using a specialized scan called “functional” MRI that spots neural activity in the brain. The kids were shown letters before and after receiving different letter-learning instruction. In children who had practiced printing by hand, the neural activity was far more enhanced and “adult-like” than in those who had simply looked at letters.”

“It seems there is something really important about manually manipulating and drawing out two-dimensional things we see all the time,” says Karin Harman James, assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience at Indiana University who led the study.”

(Farther down the page there was this, too:)

She says pictures of the brain have illustrated that sequential finger movements activated massive regions involved in thinking, language and working memory—the system for temporarily storing and managing information.”

 

Sight Word Workbooks from HeidiSongs

If any of you are unfamiliar with our Sing and Spell the Sight Word song, here is a sample of what they look like.  They are lots of fun!  Remember, active learning is the best!

 

Want some more ideas on teaching sight words?  My Pinterest Sight Words Ideas Pin Board is absolutely FILLED with awesome, HANDS-ON ideas!  Check it out!  And follow HeidiSongs on Pinterest to make sure that you don’t miss any of these great ideas!
Follow HeidiSongs’s board Sight Words Ideas on Pinterest.

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Follow me!   Did you enjoy this post? Do me a favor and share it with your friends!  And follow this blog by signing up email updates, or follow on Bloglovin’, or follow me on TPT!
I’m also on PinterestFacebookTwitterGoogle+ and YouTube, too!  Don’t forget to sign up for our email newsletter (on the left sidebar) for special deals and promo codes that you won’t find out about anywhere else.

 

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Sight Word Dice Game- Free!

Sight Word Dice Freebie!

 

“Sight Words Dice” is a FREE FUN little game for kindergartners or first graders to play in pairs or small groups to help them practice their sight words, (AKA high frequency words.)  Sound interesting?  Keep reading for more info!

Sight Word Dice Game
 To download this game, just click here.  I have included a blank version, and a version that already has some sight words filled in.  To use the blank version, you will probably have to write the words in by hand, or type up the words you want, print them out, and glue them in.

Sight Word Dice Freebie from HeidiSongs 2

To play the game:
Each child rolls the die in turn and reads the word that comes up.  He then writes it in the column under that word.  The first child to fill up one entire column is the winner of the game!

Sight Word Dice Freebie from HeidiSongs

When children aren’t sure of a word, I tell them to help each other out by singing the sight word song that goes with the song!  Most kids can start singing them on their own, and then they can figure many of these words out!  I wish I had captured a video of this happening.  I will insert a video of one of our sight word songs with children singing them here, just in case some of our readers are new to HeidiSongs and don’t know what they look like.  Below, you will see the Kinders from Friendship Elementary School singing the “As” sight word song, from Sing and Spell Vol. 4:  Fun Songs for More Sight Words.

 

To make the game last longer, you can tell the children that the first person to fill two columns will be the winner.  Have fun!

 

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Come to the CA Kindergarten Association PK1 Conference and Blogger Fiesta!!!

Facebook Fiesta Contest_Bloggers FINAL_REV

Do you have any plans for Martin Luther King, Jr. weekend yet?  (That’s Friday through Sunday, January 16, 17, and 18!)  Would you like to meet some of your FAVORITE BLOGGERS, and some really great people, and go on a tax deductible weekend away with your friends in a hotel, all while getting some wonderful new teaching ideas?  Well, CKA’s PK1 Conference in Santa Clara is the place to go!  You wouldn’t believe how many fantastic speakers we have lined up this year!  Keep reading to find out how you can WIN TWO TICKETS TO THE BLOGGER FIESTA, TOO!  (Pss:  hardly anyone has entered!)

    
    
    
    

 

PLUS, we also have Jen Jones, (Hello Literacy & Two Peas in a Pod) Kathy Zotovich, (Pure Literacy & Two Peas in a Pod) Katie Knight, (Teacher to the Core)!  I just don’t seem to have pictures for them, that’s all.  :)

I say “we” because I am now on the CKA Board of Directors, and I helped to plan this conference.  In fact, many of the bloggers that are coming are there at my personal invitation.  What do you think of THAT?  (I know, you are probably thinking, “Well, lah dee DAH!!”)  LOL!  And we are having a big Blogger’s Fiesta on Friday, January 16th, at 5:30 PM with food, fun, and prizes!  Not only that, but each person that attends the Blogger Fiesta will get a disk with more than $70 in free products on it as a special gift from the bloggers!  Tickets for this event are $35, but you do the math!  If you purchase a ticket for $35, and end up with $70 in great products, you are still $35 ahead!  :)

 

fiesta blast.003

 

Even better, would you like to WIN a pair of tickets to the Blogger Fiesta?  Just visit the California Kindergarten Association’s Facebook page and leave a comment telling why you would like to go to the fiesta!  A random winner will be picked on Thursday morning, January 8th, 2015!

 

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The conference will kick off on Friday, January 16th with a Pre-Conference Institute and lasts through Sunday, January 18th.  (I, Heidi, am presenting a TK presentation on teaching the alphabet and guided reading to emergent readers on this day!)   Then on Saturday, I am presenting a workshop on Whole Group Games and Activities for the Common Core!  Click here to download the entire conference brochure.

 

 

Loads of great professional development workshops ranging from behavior management and the importance of play to integrating the Common Core Standards will be offered throughout the weekend.  We even have Dr. Jean Feldman coming to present on Sunday, Jan. 18th!  (She couldn’t come to the Blogger Fiesta, though.  Boo hoo!)

I sure hope to see you in Santa Clara in a couple of weeks!  We’ll have an exhibit booth with some great specials on our products that we NEVER offer online, too!  :)

 

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Here is a photo of the exhibit hall at CKA in 2014. I LOVE shopping at these kinds of events!!! SO FUN!

 

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