How to Teach Kids to Sound Out CVC Words, Plus a Thanksgiving Freebie!

Parent conferences are finally OVER and done with, (hooray!) and the holiday season has begun!  My class has begun learning the songs for our Gingerbread Man musical play that we love to do, and even though we have been working on it for only one week, the children already sound like experts on most of the songs!  I have started prepping some of my holiday projects, and even have started thinking about what I might give as gifts to my parent volunteers!  But I’ll tell you more about that next week.  For now, I want to tell you about a new way to give a lesson that seems to be working out very well for my class, at least in the area of sounding out CVC words.

Match CVC Words and Pictures

1.  How to Teach Kids to Sound Out CVC Words
In my district, the teachers have all been sent to trainings on writing “Brain Compatible Direct Instruction Lesson Plans.”  The name of the company that is giving us these inservices is RISE, which recently split off from another company that was known as TESS.  Although sitting through these inservices is time consuming and can feel tedious, the good thing that they make you do is focus on creating a task analysis for each lesson.  That is, the format forces you to concentrate on breaking down each skill into the tiniest of steps for the children and teach it to them one step at a time.  And this is a good thing!  Although I do not think that every Kindergarten skill can be taught using this lesson plan format, I think that many of them can, and that it is always a good idea to think about breaking each skill down into the smallest steps possible and teaching them in a methodical manner with visual aids and a solid lesson plan in mind.  The number of steps should be kept to a minimum for Kindergartners, and should ideally be no more than five steps total. 
That being said, I thought I would share with you today the lesson that I created to teach children how to sound out words!  I thought that it went very well, and my students are actually getting very proficient at it!  I am really quite proud of them, since a large number of them appear to really be catching on quite well to this new skill with very little trouble.

The flashcards are from my CVC Book.

Of course, we definitely have spent a good, long time laying the foundation of phonemic awareness to get them ready for this big step of sounding out and reading words.  This foundation is essential to the success of this lesson because it lays the groundwork for the skill that they are trying to learn.  These foundational activities have included learning to blend onsets and rimes, such as /mmmm/  /at/ = mat.  We also worked on blending three sounds together (with no letters to look at- sounds only!)  such as /s/ /a/ /t/.  These activities lay the foundation to help children get ready to sound words out by looking at letters and making the sounds that they see, rather than just blending the sounds together that others say.  Of course, when you add the stress of having the child come up with the letter sounds him or herself, that taxes working memory even more, so if a child is a little unsure of the sounds, then it is even less likely that he or she will be successful with this activity.  Therefore, to be able to sounds out words well, children must be very fluent with the letter sounds, (meaning that they must be able to say the letter sounds quickly, easily, and automatically when they see the letters.)  If the child in question lacks this skill, then you will need to back up and fill in the missing gaps before proceeding, or you are certainly in for a struggle.Keeping in mind that this very important foundation had already been laid, these are the steps that I gave the children for sounding out the words:

Children are supposed to articulate the “Big Idea,” above.

1.  Say the letter sounds.
2.  Stretch out the sounds.
3.  Blend the sounds together.  (Say them a little faster.)
4.  Say the word. 

It was really no surprise that the children did much better with the task when I gave each step a motion!  Movement always seems to help children learn a little bit better, in my opinion and in my experience.  So when they said the letter sounds, many of them did the Zoo-Phonics signals.  Then we pulled our hands apart to stretch out the sounds.  We swept our hands to the side when we blended them together, and then I had them throw their hands out in front of themselves when they said the final word.  The more we did this, the better the children got at it, and the quicker they got at it, too!  If you would like to see a short video clip of me teaching my class to do this with the movements, I posted one on my HeidiSongs Facebook page!  Click here.
After we sounded out all of the words, we matched up the pictures on the flash cards from the CVC book with the correct words.  Then later as independent practice, we did one of the CVC worksheets from that word family from that same book.

It was interesting to me to see that some of the children, when asked to read the word, dropped the steps or reduced them down to just one or two steps almost immediately, while others stuck to all four steps the whole time we practiced!  I allowed each child to decide how many steps he or she needed to read the word correctly.  The only thing I insisted on was that each child should tell me all of the letter sounds that he or she saw first, because if they start off with wrong sound, then they will not read the word correctly.  Also, if a child hesitated, or just stood there helplessly saying that he or she didn’t know what to do, I insisted that he or she start from the beginning and go through each of the steps to arrive at the answer.

In the “RISE” brain compatible lesson, they recommend a teaching format they call the “Model Sandwich.”  In the Model Sandwich, the teacher first models the skill, then teaches the steps, and then models the skill again.  So in following this format, I modeled sounding out one CVC word.  Then I read the children the steps and taught them to recognize the picture icons that went with each one, since of course they are non-readers!  The picture cues for the steps are quite important, then, for making this teaching method work for non-readers.  Finally, I modeled sounding out a CVC word again.  This forms a Model Sandwich:  model, teach the steps, model. 

It’s a Model Sandwich Chart!

Another thing that I did to help them learn was teach them the “How Do You Sound It Out?” song that is on my Little Songs for Language Arts CD/DVD.  That song REALLY helps them learn the steps for sounding out a word!  I noticed it quite a bit when I asked them to tell me what the steps were at the end of the lesson.  More children were telling me the steps as they were worded in the song than the way they were worded in my lesson, LOL!  I am thinking that it would be a good idea to someday offer an “open” version of that song, so that teachers could play it and insert any words that they wanted to into the open spaces of the song, because just about ALL of my kids can now sound out and read the four words that we sound out in the song, which are “run,” “jump,” “swim,” and “fly.”  I think that is really neat!  Check it out below.

It seems that it is becoming quite common that school districts require that teachers post the learning objective that the children are working on in their classrooms, and prepare the children to be able to recite what that objective is, should they be asked.  However, in the RISE lesson, the children are supposed to be able to articulate both the “big idea” of the lesson (the main idea of what you are teaching) and the objective as well.  Admittedly, these can be a little tricky to distinguish between and articulate, even for the teachers!  So to assist in this I decided to post the “Big Idea” on my pocket chart along with the steps and have the children read it with me.  (I figured that it would at LEAST help ME remember what it was, LOL!)  The children are supposed to begin and end the lesson by repeating both the learning objective, the Big Idea, and the steps.  So here is the learning objective vs. the Big Idea for this lesson, put into kid friendly terms as our administration requires:

Learning Objective:  “Today we are going to learn to sound out words.”
Big Idea:  “Sounding out words is saying the letter sounds that you see and then blending them together to make a word.”

This CVC Worksheet is an example of one from the CVC Book.

 I really don’t know how much young children get out of trying to repeat these things, but I have decided that I might as well try to look at the bright side:  it is not a bad challenge to give those that have the language skills to give it a try!  For the little ones with very limited language skills, such as my English language learners, my students that qualify for speech services, or even those that are a bit immature, this task seems to be completely puzzling!  Perhaps they will get better at it with time.  I’m withholding judgement until I have spent more time training them to do this before I decide whether or not I think I would recommend it to anyone or not. 

I am including the lesson plan for this lesson as a free download for those of you that would like it.

And as an extra bonus, I am giving you the steps with the icons as well!  That way, if you would like to use the pictures to help the children learn the steps for sounding out a word, you can easily do so. 

2.  Turning the Thanksgiving Sound Effects Story into a Drawing Story
Last week, I read a blog entry from “Teach Preschool”’s Deborah Stewart called Thanksgiving time story telling with symbols in preschool.  As I read about this idea, it occurred to me that it would be a great idea to combine it with my existing Sound Effects Story for Thanksgiving!  So I tried it this week and it was a huge hit!  My students were totally enthralled, and just loved it!  I have done other kinds of “Draw and Tell” stories before, and they have always been very well received, so this should have been no surprise.  However, I have never tried to combine the two ways to tell a story.  I have to say that the first method really just enhanced the other!

 So basically, this is what I did:  when I told the story for the very first time, I told it sitting next to my white board easel.  I showed them the picture icons that I am including as a free download for you today, and I drew the pictures as I went along.  I also taught the children the sound effects as I drew.  So I as I drew the stick figure pilgrims, I told them about the pilgrims and then told them to say, “Hi, there!” each time they heard the word “pilgrims,” etc.  I actually ran out of time to finish the story before the end of the day when I introduced it, but he kids were so interested in it that at dismissal time, they did not want me to stop to send them home!  That actually really surprised me.  But what surprised me even more was the fact that the next morning, they came in asking me to finish it, first thing in the morning!

That day I left the picture icons clipped to the white board easel with magnets, and at playtime I had at least eight children all clamoring to draw those pictures on that one small easel, so I got out a bunch of individual white boards for the children to use and let as many children draw as they wished.  They had a wonderful time, and they were all telling the story as well!   I just wish I had remembered to take a few pictures of them doing that.  Darn! 
In any case, I hope that you will enjoy using these picture icons in your Thanksgiving story telling, either this year or next.  :)

Children’s drawings are so CUTE!
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Heidi Butkus

About Heidi Butkus

Heidi Butkus has been teaching in California public schools since 1985. She has somehow managed to stay in Kindergarten all of those years, with the exception of five years in first grade, and also taught a parent participation preschool for a short while! Combining a strong knowledge of brain research with practical experience, Heidi has created a wealth of fun and engaging teaching techniques that work well with diverse populations. She has presented at conferences nationwide, and is the owner and founder of HeidiSongs.com. Heidi has also created fourteen original CD's and DVD's for teaching beginning reading and math skills, three musical plays designed especially for young performers, and has written some picture books and many other teaching resources. Heidi's multimedia workshops are filled with fun and motivational educational activities that have been classroom tested and revised for effectiveness with all types of learners.

20 thoughts on “How to Teach Kids to Sound Out CVC Words, Plus a Thanksgiving Freebie!

  1. It made me want to scream when I read your comment about needing to have kindergarten children recite the lesson objectives, but since my husband and son are sleeping in, I bottled it up, like so much lately!

    On the positive side of things, I really love your icons, and I find that it does help me to have my students be able to recite certain strategies or things that they are doing (like the steps that the students are using to sound out CVC words) in small group instruction, WHILE we are applying the strategy, especially if there is a motion that goes with it. It just tickles me to then see them using the same strategies during their independent or partner work throughout the day as they help each other or work through a passage in a book.

    Thanks AGAIN for sharing!

    Erin

  2. Thank you for sharing such wonderful resources. I love your 'how do you sound it out' video and will be trying it with my students this week.

  3. You are amazing!!!! Thank you for sharing with all of us! A poem I wrote years ago has really helped my little ones with CVC words…Let's use cat for an example….

    Say it slow,
    Say it fast
    Cat, cat
    it sounds like that!
    /c…/…/aaaaaa/ /t/
    CAT!!!!

    (Kids say the word first…then after "it sounds like that"…say it slowly…and then say the WHOLE word at the end! It's important for them to say that word slowly, but then put it back where it came from! :0) ENJOY!!!! Happy Thanksgiving and Hugs to you,
    Sheri Sutterley

  4. Hi Heidi! I want to thank you for sharing all your wonderful lessons, ideas and music. I love everything. Question: What is the difference between stretching out the letter sounds and blending the sounds together? After watching your video they seem one in the same to me. Thank you again for sharing!

  5. To Candace,
    Well, when we stretch out the sounds, we pull them apart slowly. Then when you blend them together, you put them together faster. Basically, I ask them to speed it up. Most of the kids don't need the "blend them together" step, but some do. Did you watch the Facebook video? That might clear it up a little bit. There's barely a difference, but with some words, it is more noticeable than with others, depending on the consonant sounds in the words.
    Heidi

  6. Thank you so much for sharing!! I absolutely love your videos and will implement all of these wonderful ideas into my teaching. This is my first time teaching K. I am so thankful I found your blog.

  7. You're such an amazing teacher/internet – mentor (is that a word? …it should be…I feel like I learn so much from your blog posts as well as your facebook posts!! Thank you for all you share and for breaking it down so the rest of us can see it so clearly! I appreciate your generosity and willingness to share so much!
    Swamp Frog First Graders

  8. I agree–you are my internet mentor! I look forward to your blog each Friday! My students are doing really well this year and I think a great deal of it has to do with all of your amazing music and resources I have been using!!! I used your sight word turkey game this past week and my kids LOVED it!!thank you!!!

  9. Heidi,
    You inspire me to be a better teacher every day! Your materials and your willingness to share them gives me the confidence, motivation and resources I need to do my best for my kiddos. THANK YOU.

  10. glomsHeidi,
    You inspire me to be a better teacher every day! Your materials and your willingness to share them gives me the confidence, motivation and resources I need to do my best for my kiddos. THANK YOU.

  11. Heidi,

    My district (over in Texas) is requiring all teachers to post objectives. I am so overwhelmed! Do you do this already? I was wondering if you had any ideas on posting objectives or a way that you do it in your classroom.

  12. To Anonymous,
    Yes, we are required to post objectives in "kid friendly terms," so I have them posted next to each center table on a small Wooden Lap Board Display Stand. I got the stands for about five dollars each at this link:

    http://www.abcstuff.com/cgi/Web_store/web_store.cgi/cart_id=6881554.6464&item=LH008&product=&keywords=wooden%20stand&exact=yes.

    Anyway, I taped a dry erase marker to a piece of yarn and then taped it to the back of the dry erase board. I made sure that it was a marker with an eraser on the cap. That way, I just have to quickly walk around the room and change the sign to something like, "We are learning to write the letters," or something like that. The truth is that half of the time, I forget to change what the sign says, but then, most of the time, the principal doesn't walk through to check, so I guess it doesn't matter too much, does it? :)

    There is another way to do it, too. If you can write out most of the objectives you normally use and then put them in page protectors. Make sure that you print them out so that there is just one objective on each page, so you'll probably need large print. Then put them all on a chicken ring so you don't lose any. Put all of the language arts objectives on one ring, and all of the math objectives on another, etc. Then find a place on a wall near where you teach each lesson that you can pin that objective up on the wall easily. When you start the lesson, tell the kids, "This is what we are going to learn today!" and show them the objective on the ring and pin it up, hanging it by the chicken rings.
    We used to do this when our administration wanted us to post the state standard for every lesson, so one of the teachers came up with the idea of writing every single one of them up in large print and putting them in page protectors. We just switched the pages in and out to satisfy the administration until they forgot about that particular requirement. :)
    I have to admit it seems like an INCREDIBLE waste of time; however, I now know those standards like the back of my hand….
    Heidi

  13. Heidi, we have to post daily learning targets in my district. I usually take the main objective and put into kid friendly language. I have it on our smart board as we do our opening routine, and then just have it posted on a piece of paper above the smart board so it is shown throughout our day. Typically I just write 2 or 3 learning targets for my K4 class, otherwise I would be writing out targets for basically everything we do. Of course I also need to state it as I am teaching specific lessons as well.

  14. To Sue,
    That sounds like a lot of work and a pretty big waste of time, if you ask me, at least in terms of what the kids are getting out of it at the Kindergarten level. I would be interested to know if, after one full year of doing that, there are any measurable gains in achievement as a result. How long does it take you to do all of that, anyway? And can the children read any of it? At the very least, I hope that you are gaining something from thinking about what your objectives are.
    Heidi

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